Posts Tagged Corporate Culture

Olympic interview!

Just a short anecdote for a easy-going Sunday: A few days ago I went to London for some job discussions. One of these was a very short notice appointment worked in the agenda for less than an hour: “Meet me at the Ritz“. Nothing special to it so far…

But when I got there, I met a guy in shorts and a Olympia T-Shirt, accompanied by a client/friend – they were on their way to watch some games at the Olympics. As they wouldn’t have let him into the Ritz in this ‘inappropriate’ outfit anyway, we decided for the next best pub and a pint.
Actually we spend the time talking about sports and travelling and didn’t touch on any business topic at all. That I just before met a friend and had a pint helped the conversation flow… 🙂

I conducted casual interviews over breakfast, lunch or just two coffee myself, both as a hiring manager and an interviewee, but even then we where discussing mostly business and kept a form of business attire.

I have to admit that this additional informality adds another interesting aspect for selection and employer branding really that intrigued me – and I am far to ‘senior’ to be a Millennial 😉 The candidate learns a lot about company culture and it gives both sides the opportunity to explore a cultural match.

And don’t forget: it was fun 🙂 If it wasn’t fun for both sides, one could skip the rest of the selection process anyway. Hands-up who likes to work with people with whom he cannot imagine to go for a drink (including water and milk) after a long day?

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#CSR at work: #adidas

I just finished an accreditation in Albania, Nehemiah Gateway University, Buçimas.
http://www.ng-university.org
It’s not talent management/HR, but CSR is getting increasingly important for employer branding – and I found a good example of CSR, which I would like to share: adidas sponsored their sports facilities and furthermore regulary takes interns to their HQ in Germany as well as conducting an annual sports festival.
I could recognize that this has a big impact here for the local economy and the physical education of pupils and students. Great initiative without a direct financial return for them, which means it’s ‘real’ CSR, not just stealth business development.
Kudos!

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Why I Hire People Who Fail – Harvard Business Review

Some interesting thoughts which might encourage to reflect on the common obsession with the perfectly streamlined candidate. And I love the idea of the “Failure Wall”.

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Stand up!

“Employees follow strict rules: Attendance is mandatory, nonwork chitchat is kept to a minimum and, above all, everyone has to stand up.

Stand-up meetings are part of a fast-moving tech culture in which sitting has become synonymous with sloth. The object is to eliminate long-winded confabs where participants pontificate, play Angry Birds on their cellphones or tune out.

Atomic Object even frowns upon tables during meetings. (…)

As Agile has become more widely adopted, stand-ups have spread along with it. VersionOne, which makes Agile-development software, polled 6,042 tech employees around the world in a 2011 survey and found that 78% held daily stand-up-meetings.” (more)

I am not sure whether this goes very well along with some aspects of diversity (namely age and disability). And, serving in the Army, I know how hard it is to stand still and upright for more than five minutes. Or just ask a shop assistant… concentrating on standing upright easily spoils your attention.

Most important of all: the whole approach is overengineered and best case unproductive. Why force people to stand up in mandatory meetings? Make _all_ meetings voluntary. If only people show up, who have an interest in the meeting, productivity and efficiency should boost. But that would ask for pre-meeting information like an agenda and the expected outcome – not everyone is used to this.

On the other hand I have to admit that I tend to stand-up and maybe even walk across the room during meetings. But I guess that isn’t what is meant here…

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